ALS Full Form| What is ALS-Symptoms, Treatment And Prognosis?

ALS Full Form

ALS Full Form-What is ALS? – Symptoms, Treatment And Prognosis: ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord.

ALS Full Form

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

FAQs About ALS:

The symptoms of ALS vary and depend on the size and location of the damage. Among them is: Facial weakness Defensive gait Struggle to speak Lower limb weakness Slurred speech Diagnosis of ALS As with many other conditions, diagnosis of ALS involves ruling out other conditions, and relies on a careful history and examination. An MRI or CT scan of the brain and spine are often used to examine for lesions that can cause symptoms of ALS. Diagnosis can be done through a neurologist, geriatrician, physician assistant, or other healthcare professional. Genetic testing of family members is sometimes helpful in ruling out a family history of ALS. Treatment The treatment of ALS includes managing pain, improving muscle strength, improving speech and the use of mobility aids.

ALS is diagnosed through a neurologist's testing and analysis of the patient's symptoms. Assessment of a patient with ALS, on symptoms, can be done through several tasks. Apart from assessing neurological function, the patient's gait, balance and speech is assessed for their accuracy. Physical strength and endurance is also tested by making patients walk, do simple tasks like carrying groceries and balancing while standing. Severe cases of ALS can make it difficult for patients to speak, walk or eat on their own. In this case, a feeding tube is employed for nutrition and the doctor and nurses have to physically feed the patient with a tube inserted into the nose and going down to the stomach. For gas evacuation and environmental functions, a Foley catheter can be used.

Vital Signs What's going on with my body? Audio version of Vital Signs What's going on with my body? Audio version of Vital Signs What causes ALS? - Life Expectancy Human Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) remains unknown, the earliest documented description of the condition goes back to 1817. Although the earliest human symptoms were identified in 1831, symptoms only started appearing in 1908. According to the ALS Association, the condition has the lowest survival rate of all the severe neurological diseases. One person dies every two weeks in the U.S. People affected by ALS lose the ability to move, speak, swallow, see, think, and ultimately, live. According to the ALS Association, the condition has the lowest survival rate of all the severe neurological diseases.

Periods of disability: Early People who were diagnosed in the very early stages had a higher risk of dying of heart disease than those who had been diagnosed later in life. But, after that age group, the disease came down. Age of diagnosis: Between 40 and 65 years old Difficulty completing complex tasks: Early Though the upper-body muscles weaken, the brain remains as healthy as it was before. Loss of speech, swallowing and motor control: Later The person can have difficulty walking or talking. They are prone to eating difficulties. The muscles in the arms also fail. Early or late It is difficult to say which form of the disease a patient will have. The variations are caused by changes in the proteins that cause the disease.

Summary of key topics Description of ALS disease and pathology Signs, symptoms, and progression Systemic symptoms Diagnosis Definitions Risk factors Treatment Prognosis Treatment guidelines Acknowledgements References Terminology